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Wheeling in to West Yorkshire

Arriving in Holmfirth


View 2015 Compo and Doc Martin on greatgrandmaR's travel map.

In the morning, I went to charge my camera batteries and left them charging while we went to breakfast.
Door to our room

Door to our room

Door to the Tiny elevator

Door to the Tiny elevator

Breakfast hours

Breakfast hours

Breakfast buffet used dishes trolley

Breakfast buffet used dishes trolley


They had scrambled eggs, baked beans, sausages, croissants, pain de chocolate, fruit, cereal and juice.
My breakfast, eggs, sausage and  pain de chocolate

My breakfast, eggs, sausage and pain de chocolate


And tea of course.
Tea at breakfast

Tea at breakfast


When we checked out, our original card was blocked. So I had the original open charge on my first credit card for $57.71 (£39) and an additional charge on the second card for £59 (or $91 US). This should have been a clue to me about this hotel. But I was concentrating on getting to Holmfirth so I did not pick up on the clue. Before we actually left, we sat in the car while I called NFCU. It was the same as the last time I had a card refused - they typed in the wrong expiration date. We waited while she reinstated it. So we left about 10. I had put the lat/lon in my GPS but I was only able to tell the car GPS the road the place was on.

The car has a back-up camera which beeps if you get too close to something. It beeps if you get to close to any corner. So if you are stopped at a light, and someone walks across in front of you, the car beeps. Also MY GPS kept telling me when there was a speed camera and when it did that, it beeped. Bob wanted to know what all the beeps meant. (As if I knew.) We went along the river and through the fields
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Near the top of Holme Moss

Near the top of Holme Moss


- lots of bicyclists - and across what I find is Holme Moss which is a moor in the South Pennines of England, on the border between the High Peak district of Derbyshire and the Kirklees district of West Yorkshire just inside the boundary of the Peak District National Park. The park land has lots of hiking and walking areas. Holme Moss is the source of the River Holme. It is covered with snow in the winter, so locals go there for sledding. For bicycling, the northern side of Holme Moss in particular is one of England's best known bicycle ascents.
Lone Cyclist

Lone Cyclist

Switchbacks

Switchbacks


A6024 crossed Holme Moss, which looked in the early spring a little like some areas of the western US
Stone walls along the road

Stone walls along the road

Holme Moss in spring sunshine

Holme Moss in spring sunshine


We saw the Holme Moss transmitting station which is near the highest point of the moor. The road also runs alongside Brownhill Resevoir before getting to Holmbridge.
Holme Moss transmitting station

Holme Moss transmitting station


Holme is the first town you come to if you cross Holme Moss from west to east on A6024 just before you get to Holmbridge.
Holme sign

Holme sign


large_ead22000-4088-11e9-9440-251f68b3f6e0.JPGSlate roof detail

Slate roof detail


Coddy's Farm

Coddy's Farm

Car we rented at Coddy's BandB

Car we rented at Coddy's BandB


We got to the B&B about 10:30 and there was a boy there clearing up. He said check-in time was 4 pm. So we left and went into Holmfirth along narrow lanes with stone walls on each side and barely room for one car.
road down toward town

road down toward town

Stone walls on each side

Stone walls on each side


One of the characteristics of roads in this area is the stone walls that line them. A lot of these stone walls are drystone with hedgerows, which means that no mortar is used to hold the stones together. In the early days of Kentucky, they also built drystone walls. (In Kentucky, most of the masons were Irish.) Unlike in Kentucky, in West Yorkshire, the walls will have hedgerows on top. But the part of the wall that might come into contact with the car paintwork is the stone part, and not usually the hedgerow part.
Narrow West Yorkshire Lanes

Narrow West Yorkshire Lanes


By the time we got there, it was almost time for lunch. So I got the GPS to take us to Compo's Cafe. There were two cats there.
Compo's Cafe cat

Compo's Cafe cat


The Cafe didn't open until Half Eleven, so we waited in the car.
Compo's from the parking lot

Compo's from the parking lot

Bus stopping at bus stop across from Compo's Cafe

Bus stopping at bus stop across from Compo's Cafe


One of the things I noticed about Holmfirth was the buses. In the show Last of the Summer Wine they were always taking a bus someplace. So think for someone little more mobile than I am, it wouldn't be necessary to have a car
Inside Compo's Cafe
Inside Compo's

Inside Compo's


the walls were decorated with photos and pictures of the cast.
Nora Batty's picture in Compo's Cafe

Nora Batty's picture in Compo's Cafe

Photos of the cast on the wall

Photos of the cast on the wall

Clock on the wall

Clock on the wall


The menu had a pensioner's special and I got a chicken leg and Bob got Cod and chips (£5.50)  - Pensioner's special

Cod and chips (£5.50) - Pensioner's special


Came with bread and butter and tea.
Bread and butter and tea

Bread and butter and tea


Narrow old world streets mean that there's little parking in town. I got the idea that we could leave the car there (parking was free) and I could take the scooter into town. On the way down the street on the scooter, we saw a cemetery. I thought it was St. John the Evangelist which is where Bill Owen (who played Compo) is buried, but it was not. The sign on the gate was too faded to read. We saw the bus that gives the Last of the Summer Wine tour.
7379753-Summerwine_Tour_bus_Holmfirth.jpgSummerwine tour bus passing Wrinkled Stocking Tearoom

Summerwine tour bus passing Wrinkled Stocking Tearoom


Holmfirth Tourist Information Centre

Holmfirth Tourist Information Centre


The information center of a town is always a good first stop and the one in Holmfirth is no exception. When we went to the Information Center and the lady there was VERY helpful, and told us told us about the possible parking lots. There's little parking in town unless you use a Pay and Display parking lot like we used in Port Isaac. The rules for the lot are that you will get a ticket if:
1 - you fail to display the ticket
2 - you overstaying the time, or you not having the time you paid for visible
3 - not parking entirely within the marked space
There was one by the library and information center (Council Offices Car Park) which she thought we might be able to use as it was a weekend, There was a free one by the market where we might find a space if it wasn't a big market day,
There was one in town by the bus station (Station Road Car Park) which was limited to two hours of time, and
There was one by the co-op (Crown Bottom Car Park).
The Station Road Car Park was difficult to use as the spaces were cattywampus and our rental car was too big to fit very well.
The Crown Bottom Car Park on Market Street by the Co-op was the largest one and the easiest to use as it was laid out on a grid. 20p for 30 mins, 40p for 1 hour, 60p for 2 hours.
Parking

Parking


While I was at the information center, I bought a book map - details of the Holmfirth area. They also had a lot of funny post cards, books, DVDs and some articles of clothing.
Humerous post cards

Humerous post cards


Bag or T-shirt

Bag or T-shirt

7381456-CDs_pens_travel_guides_etc_Holmfirth.jpgBooks, CD's pens, travel guides etc

Books, CD's pens, travel guides etc


One of the things that the boy who rented us the car said was that he often cycled in this region. We saw cyclists on our way there. Last year part of the tour de France was held in Yorkshire, and that this year there was going to be a tour de Yorkshire. That had really increased the interest in cycling.
Cyclists at a light

Cyclists at a light


There are cyclists everywhere, in neon spandex, bike helmets, and shoes that clack when they walk. There are cycling routes, cycling clubs and guided rides
Library and Council Offices Parking Lot

Library and Council Offices Parking Lot


Bob went to get the car which we had left at the top of the hill and came down and parked in the council parking lot next door while he loaded the scooter back in the car. Bob parked on the street near the cemetery we saw, but he parked too far away and I had to have the scooter out again to get there. Unfortunately, the grass inside was too long for me to do anything but sit on the scooter.
Long grass in the cemetery

Long grass in the cemetery


I figured out that St. John the Evangelist was up the next street, but it was about 120 degree turn to the left to get to the street. A lady who was in the house on the corner saw us through the window and came out to direct!!! Then we passed the gate on the other side of the unnamed cemetery that we had just been in and the sign wasn't quite so deteriorated so I took a photo of it and that told us the name.
Sign on the gate

Sign on the gate


It was the Lane United Reformed Church Upper Graveyard. The Lane United Reformed Church declined in membership and the building which formerly housed the church has been turned into apartments. This cemetery which has one side on Upperthong Lane has often been mistaken for part of St John the Evangelist Churchyard. Sign on the gate says in part

Lane United Reformed Church Holmfrith
Upper Graveyard

The church is now closed and to preserve the amanity of the graveyard it has been locked.
BIrd

BIrd


We were about halfway up the hill when we met a whole bunch of cars coming down. We backed up into someone's driveway. There was a truck behind us - I don't know where he went. I turned out that there had just been a wedding at St. John's. We parked and went in. St John the Evangelist Churchyard

St John the Evangelist Churchyard


A lady saw us come in and told me that there was a ramp in back and I should come into the church, so I did.
Refrigerator magnet they gave us

Refrigerator magnet they gave us


The camera battery that I had just topped up last night was now only 1/4 full.
7382145-Front_of_the_church_inside_Holmfirth.jpgeb84a720-4088-11e9-9440-251f68b3f6e0.JPG
I talked to the minister (a woman) and took some photos in the church. The church of St. John the Evangelist was built in 1847. In the history of the church it was written "The living is a vicarage, net yearly value £211, with residence, in the gift of the Crown and the Bishop of Wakefield alternately." Rev. John W. Jeffery was the vicar from 1881 to 1909. His parishioners put a plaque in the church after his death.
Plaque inside for Rev. John W. Jeffery

Plaque inside for Rev. John W. Jeffery

For the centennial of the church they constructed the entrance gate (Lynch gate) which also commemorates those who died in WWII
1948 Lynch gate for 100th Anniversary

1948 Lynch gate for 100th Anniversary


Bob walked around outside taking photos also, especially of Bill Owen (Compo's) grave
0766 St John the Evangelist Churchyard

0766 St John the Evangelist Churchyard


Bill Owen, whose full name was Wm. J. Owen Rowbotham
Grave marker with his full name

Grave marker with his full name


is best-loved for his role as the mischievous Compo, in BBC’s TV series “Last of the Summer Wine”.
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He was a professional entertainer for 63 year’s and spent 26 of those years as the little man in a woolly hat and wellies. His wellies almost had the status of another character in the show. He also appeared in 46 feature films, such as “When the Bough Breaks”, “Once a Jolly Swagman”, “Georgy Girl”, “Lindsay Anderson's O Lucky Man” and many of the early “Carry Ons” films. As a songwriter in partnership with Mike Sammes, he wrote the lyrics for dozens of pop songs for the artist Engelbert Humperdinck, Harry Secombe, Sacha Distel Pat Boone and Sir Cliff Richard's 1960s hit, “Marianne”. He died at age 85 in Highgate, England. Although he was born in London (he was a cockney), he was an adopted Yorkshire man and wanted to be buried in Holmfirth. His son Tom arranged for him to be buried at St. John the Evangelist,
Grave marker for Bill Owen

Grave marker for Bill Owen


and promised to take care of the gravesite. Unfortunately, according to the vicar, he has not honoured this obligation.In any case the grave is right behind the church and has a profusion of wellies displayed on it.
7380492-Wellies_at_his_grave_Holmfirth.jpgWellies at his grave

Wellies at his grave


Then we tried to park next to the Holmfirth Market, but all the parking places were taken and we gave up and went back to Compo's and got a meat and potato pie each for dinner and then tried to get back to Coddy's Farm. After making a couple of wrong turns, we arrived about 3:50. The lady that welcomed us, said that the couple who they had booked into the ground floor handicapped room was just as happy to have one of the rooms upstairs (probably cheaper), so we got a handicapped room after all. It has a huge shower
Shower

Shower

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and the bathroom as a whole has heated floors and heated towel racks and is big enough to park a car in.
King sized bed

King sized bed

7379058-Seating_area_Holmfirth.jpgTV on the wall

TV on the wall

Closet

Closet


We were very happy. I could do limited internet, but not really post photos.
e9bcb860-4088-11e9-9440-251f68b3f6e0.JPGView from the farm

View from the farm

Sunset

Sunset


Tomorrow we will take the Last of the Summer Wine tour.

Posted by greatgrandmaR 11:14 Archived in England Comments (2)

Exploring the Byways of West Yorkshire

Last of the Summer Wine Tour

Bob got up and shaved and I got up and took a shower. I wasn't sure if the little table in the bathroom was to sit on (and I can't take the scooter in the shower of course), so I sat on my cane seat. Then we went to breakfast. We were the first people down.
Breakfast being cooked

Breakfast being cooked


There was a fire in the stove.
Welcome warmth from the Stove in the corner

Welcome warmth from the Stove in the corner


We ate looking out over the countryside.
Reservoir

Reservoir


We could see the reservoir over in the distance. And a
Town

Town


I had an egg sandwich which came on a huge bun bigger than a hamburger bun. I didn't take a photo until I'd eaten some of it and then I took the first picture with the bottom side up.
Egg Sandwich right side up

Egg Sandwich right side up


Bob had porridge.
Bob's bowl

Bob's bowl


The farm has black Angus cattle and sheep.
Part of the farm

Part of the farm


They've been lambing. More about the lambing later

We drove into town - I told the GPS in the car to take us to Victoria Street. This time it took us straight down into town without going all around Robin Hood's barn. On the way we were on Cemetery Road and passed Holy Trinity Church Cemetery. The church itself is right in the middle of town, but the cemetery is out here.
7392809-Cemetery_Holmfirth.jpg
If you have any interest in the TV Series "Last of the Summer Wine", you have to take Colin's tour in his antique bus.
Welcome to Summerwine Magic - the tour

Welcome to Summerwine Magic - the tour

Winding our way down the peaceful valleys

Winding our way down the peaceful valleys

On now to the sleepy little hamlet where Wesleys garage and Edies cottage

On now to the sleepy little hamlet where Wesleys garage and Edies cottage

Meet your guide Colin

Meet your guide Colin


It leaves from next to the Holy Trinity Parish Church. Located in the centre of Holmfirth, in the layby outside Sids Cafe, opposite the main bus station. If the tour is operating, Colin puts a sign outside Sid's Cafe. I did some research and booked our trip on days that the tour would be operating.

There are two Anglican churches in Holmfirth - Holy Trinity which is the Parish church
Holy Trinity - Holmfirth Parish Church

Holy Trinity - Holmfirth Parish Church


and St. John the Evangelist which is on Upperthong Lane and thus technically in Upperthong and not really in Holmfirth. The Lane United Reformed Church no longer exists except for the cemetery. Bob thought we could park in the bus station lot
Bus station

Bus station

Parking lot by the bus station

Parking lot by the bus station


but you can only park for 2 hours there and I thought the tour would be longer. But Bob said it was only a 45 minute tour and what would they do to us anyway. But we left that parking lot
Exit from the bus station

Exit from the bus station


and parked at the Co-op which had BIG spaces, easy to park in, and used the scooter to get back to the place to take the tour.
Bob paying for parking

Bob paying for parking

Parking

Parking


The sign pointed to the left to the bus station, but we accidentally went into the Methodist church parking lot.
7386859-Church_from_the_road_Holmfirth.jpgHolmfirth Methodist Church

Holmfirth Methodist Church


Dedicated parking for the Methodist minister

Dedicated parking for the Methodist minister


There was a small cemetery behind the church.
7386871-part_of_small_cemetery_Holmfirth.jpgSmall cemetery back of the church

Small cemetery back of the church


The cemetery behind the Holmfirth Methodist Church has some old graves and some memorial plaques to those who died in WWI. Cemetery grave markers are for people who died in the mid to late 1800s. We took some photos - It turned out that this cemetery was already on Find A Grave with most of the memorials already in place. But our photos were enough clearer that I could add full inscriptions to most of the memorials. Someone going into the church saw me taking photos of the war memorials and asked me what I was doing. I just said I was interested in war memorials. He said these had been lying on the ground before they were put on the wall of the church and had gotten discolored. He wasn't having much luck cleaning them.
Plaque to WWI dead

Plaque to WWI dead


I've been thinking about it and it seems to me (while Find A Grave can't advocate it or anything) that he might get help from those people that put marble counters into kitchens - surely they have some way to remove stains.

We came out of the back of the church and crossed over the river.
River from the pedestrian bridge in mid March

River from the pedestrian bridge in mid March


In the center of Holmfrith, next to the river is a small park area with flower beds, and paths. It is between Station Road and the Holme River and you can get to it by a footbridge across the river,
From the footbridge side

From the footbridge side

Bob's photo of me

Bob's photo of me


or by walking along Station Road.
Station Road - where the bus station is

Station Road - where the bus station is

Looking over the wall at the bus station

Looking over the wall at the bus station


Holmeside Memorial Garden from Station Road

Holmeside Memorial Garden from Station Road


Gate on Station Road

Gate on Station Road


Somewhat unexpectedly, it contains a number of very old gravestones. There are 80 different people listed. One of the older gravestone says
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HERE lieth the Body of Peter William Dyson Son of Thomas Dyson of Dalton who departed this Life ye 9th Day of May 1791 in the 8th Year of his Age. Nature will weep but O repress the tears Since Christ and his salvation are so near The gospel loud invites us to rejoice We wou d not harken to a Saviour's voice

The stone inside the gate is for Jonathan Brook (d. 1807), his two wives Sarah (d 1802) and Catherine (d 1804) and his daughter Mary d 1802 at age 10.
Stone for the Brook family on the ground by gate

Stone for the Brook family on the ground by gate


Some of the stones are flat on the ground (probably marking the original grave), and others are on the wall at the end of the park (probably these have been "relocated". The stones are probably why cycling, roller blading and exercising of dogs is prohibited.
Jane Lockwood d. Aged 6 Years and 10 Months  and her parents

Jane Lockwood d. Aged 6 Years and 10 Months and her parents

There was no sign to tell us the name of this park, so after I got home to the USA, I called the Tourist Information People. When they got back to me they said it was the Holmeside Memorial Garden. We saw the Maythorne Cross.
Maythorne Cross

Maythorne Cross

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There were lots of cyclists in town.
Cornerhouse Cafe with bikes

Cornerhouse Cafe with bikes

Bicycles parked outside a cafe

Bicycles parked outside a cafe

Cyclists

Cyclists


"Downtown" Holmfirth has many little shops and cafes.
Brambles Bar and Cafe

Brambles Bar and Cafe

Almond clothing store

Almond clothing store


The main landmark (other than Holy Trinity church) is the
298135577392794-Ironmongers_.._Holmfirth.jpgJ.W.K. Ironmongers on the corner and the church

J.W.K. Ironmongers on the corner and the church


because that is where you head for when you want to see Sid's Cafe. The Ironmongers probably not really a place where a tourist is apt to be buying something.

Closer view of Holy Trinity

Closer view of Holy Trinity


Holy Trinity Church of Holmfirth is right in the middle of town. It is the Parish Church for the town of Holmfirth (so it is Anglican aka Church of England or what we call Episcopal). The church is a building of stone, erected in 1777 on the site of a former chapel of ease, and consists of nave, aisles, and an embattled tower containing a clock and 6 bells, cast about 1830. The interior was restored in 1875. Some of the tombstones for the parishioners are in the Holmside Memorial Park, but the majority are in the cemetery on Cemetery Road which is above the town
Alley on one side of the church

Alley on one side of the church


Signboard with church name and hours

Signboard with church name and hours

Church billboard

Church billboard

Stairs by Holy Trinity church

Stairs by Holy Trinity church


It is right next to Sid's Cafe and it is next to this church that the Summer Wine tours start.
Stairs by Sid's Cafe

Stairs by Sid's Cafe


Holmfirth is full of winding streets and steps, some of which I recognize from the TV series. And even if I don't, there are photographic angles everywhere.
Corner

Corner


And that includes the rooflines and chimneys.
Chimney pots

Chimney pots


We got to the Sid's Cafe, but it was still only 10:40. The cafe was beside the church - there were two steps up to the forecourt and I saw what looked to be about 15 bicyclists going in there and it was only a small place.
Cyclist getting ready to go in the Cafe

Cyclist getting ready to go in the Cafe


So we left the scooter outside and went in to Beatties Cafe instead.
Beatties

Beatties


Deli counter through the door

Deli counter through the door


Scrumptous desserts at Beatties

Scrumptous desserts at Beatties


Bob got a
Hot chocolate

Hot chocolate


and
a Danish

a Danish


I got
Tea

Tea


and
A scone and jam

A scone and jam


We weren't done by 11 so Bob went out and talked to Colin (who runs the tours) and he confirmed that while the tours went on from 11 to 3, they only took 45 minutes. So we would be on the noon tour.
325062997381431-Behind_touri.._Holmfirth.jpgTourists on the 11:00 tour taking photos

Tourists on the 11:00 tour taking photos


Except for the map I bought at the Visitors Center, and food, we only bought two things in Holmfirth. One of them was here at Beatties. Bob bought some tea pigs because their literature said that better tea would result when tea leaves were whole and not chopped up.
Display of tea pigs (right of archway)

Display of tea pigs (right of archway)


When we got home, he tried them and wasn't that impressed. Beatties had a number of other items for sale
Creme brule packages

Creme brule packages

Basket of pasta

Basket of pasta

Jams and jellies

Jams and jellies


We saw someone with a coffee pot with a plunger which they showed us - apparently you put the coffee grounds in it and the water and let the coffee brew and then when you are ready to drink it, you push the plunger and the vacuum pulls all the grounds to the bottom and you can pour the coffee off the top without any grounds in it. I think they called it a French press. My daughter confirmed that's what you call it.

Anyway we got on the noon bus. When we asked what we should do with my scooter, he said he would just chain it to the tour sign.
Scooter chained to the sign

Scooter chained to the sign


And that's what he did. I took a photo of him on the phone before the tour started.
Colin makes a call

Colin makes a call


Then he drove us around and showed us all the various places things were filmed. It was hard to take photos because of reflections and movement. We saw where Compo and Nora Batty lived. Compo's Home which contained the Summer Wine Exhibition is next to the Wrinkled Stocking Tearoom (Nora Batty's stockings were wrinkled unless she was dressed up) and was definitely not accessible, so we didn't try to visit.
Near Compo's house

Near Compo's house

Compo's house

Compo's house

Tearoom from the bus

Tearoom from the bus

Street where Summer Wine Exhibit is located

Street where Summer Wine Exhibit is located


He showed us where Roz (Pearl's sister) lived.
Roz's house

Roz's house


We saw where Howard and Cleggy lived. He showed us where Glenda and Barry lived. He showed us where Bill Owen stayed when they were filming.
Winter trees

Winter trees


7392803-Colins_Magic_Tour_Bus.jpgRoad from inside the bus

Road from inside the bus

Country lane

Country lane


We met a caravan (camper) and the driver asked our driver Colin if this was the way to Holmfirth.
One possible road to Holmfirth

One possible road to Holmfirth


Colin said, "Well it is one way".
Later the lady at the farm said they used one of their walls for Compo to stand on.
large_7392800-Colins_Magic_Tour_Bus.jpg7392853-Town_from_the_tour_bus_Holmfirth.jpgHouses clustered among fields

Houses clustered among fields


He showed us the church where Glenda and Barry were married.
Church where Glenda and Barry were married in the distance

Church where Glenda and Barry were married in the distance


He pointed out where Wesley's shed was, but it isn't there anymore because when the actor playing Wesley died, they tore it down. .
Shed like Wesley's shed

Shed like Wesley's shed

Piebald Draft horse

Piebald Draft horse


As usual the filming locations were spread out and not all in one place like it looks like they would be in the film.
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Piebald draft horse

Piebald draft horse


He also explained the various mill towns and their history. West Yorkshire is full of little mill towns - mostly in the case of the area near Holmfirth they were textile mills.
Mill chimney

Mill chimney

Old mill worker's houses

Old mill worker's houses


Upperthong, Hepworth, Thongbridge, Holmbridge and especially Wooldale are some notable textile mill towns. In Wooldale were
Albion Mill.
Choppards Mill.
Ford Mill.
Glendale Mills.
Kirkbridge Mill.
Lee Mills.
Midgeon Wood Bottom Mill.
Moorbrook Mills.
Stoney Bank Mill.
Town Mill.
Underbank Mill.
Upper Mytholm Bridge Mills.
Washpit Mill.
Wildspur Mill.
View of the houses on the side of a hill from bus

View of the houses on the side of a hill from bus


Some of the narrative was taped (where he had to pay attention to his driving) and some wasn't. We saw the Red Lion pub
Red Lion

Red Lion


and the White Horse
Area around the White Horse

Area around the White Horse


The White Horse is not directly in Holmfirth. It is in Jackson Bridge, but it has a Holmfirth PO address. It is in what is called a mill beck. A beck is apparently where a small stream flows. We didn't stay here, but the Inn was on the Last of the Summer Wine tour because it was often used in the show.
White Horse Inn

White Horse Inn


Because the road runs almost right by the door and the car park is across the from it., when they were filming they blocked off the road and made a big area in front of the White Horse. Filming took place both inside and out.
White Horse Inn from the bus

White Horse Inn from the bus


He told us about the two floods - one the dam at the reservoir burst and killed about 80 people and the other one was a cloudburst upstream which killed three people. Bob took photos of the pictures of the 1944 flood that were in the van.
Picture of the 1944 flood in the Summer Wine bus

Picture of the 1944 flood in the Summer Wine bus

Another photo of the 1944 flood

Another photo of the 1944 flood


Something that appears to be one of the main dangers of small communities in some areas of England. Not the kind of floods that occur along the Mississippi with the spring melt where the water rises relatively slowly and covers the flood plain, but more on the order of a cloud burst or the breach of a dam. The floods appear to be more severe as the population increases and they seem to surprise people each time. In 1738 rainstorms caused the River Holme to burst its banks and flood the valley. Though there was damage to farmland there was no loss of life. This was the first recorded flood.Following a severe storm on Wednesday 21 July 1777 the River Holme burst its banks and flooded the valley. Three people were drowned and a stone church built in 1476 was swept away. The River Holme again flooded the valley around Holmfirth, following rainstorms on 21 September 1821, with no loss of life.The 1852 flood occurred when the embankment of the Bilberry reservoir collapsed, causing 81 deaths and a large amount of damage to property in the valley. The buildings and structures destroyed included four mills, ten dye houses, three drying stoves, 27 cottages, seven tradesmen’s houses, seven shops, seven bridges crossing the River Holme, ten warehouses, eight barns and stables. On Whit Monday, 29 May 1944, flash flooding following a severe thunderstorm, caused the deaths of 3 people in the Holme Valley.
Memorial to the Peace of Ammens  next to the public toilets

Memorial to the Peace of Ammens next to the public toilets

Height of the 1852 flood

Height of the 1852 flood


There is a monument to the Peace of Ammens in 1801. There is a metal plate on that memorial that shows the height of the 1852 flood.
Picturedrome from across the Holme River

Picturedrome from across the Holme River


I did not understand this at the time, but this old movie house which was once called the Holme Valley Theatre is now a live music venue with a bar. In 1998 it was remodeled and re-named The Picturedrome
Next to the Picturedrome

Next to the Picturedrome


It is right next to the
Old Bridge Inn

Old Bridge Inn


I would have been glad to book the Old Bridge Hotel in the center of Holmfirth. It did have wi-fi. But their website says We have no ground floor rooms and the rooms we have are accessed by stairs only and and limited car parking. And I needed either a ground floor room or an elevator, and did not want a hassle with parking

We got back about one, and used the public restrooms. There was a handicapped restroom, but it was boarded up and they put it in the regular Ladies.
Female toilet door

Female toilet door


Sinks in the ladies side

Sinks in the ladies side

Handicapped toilet

Handicapped toilet

My selfie in the public restrooms

My selfie in the public restrooms


On the way back to the car, we took photos of all the grave markers in Holmeside Memorial Garden
River from the bank

River from the bank


People feeding the birds (from pedestrian bridge)

People feeding the birds (from pedestrian bridge)


and also of the people feeding the ducks.
Mandarin Duck on the far shore

Mandarin Duck on the far shore

Mallards on the edge of the river

Mallards on the edge of the river


Then we retrieved the car.
Post box (aka mail box)

Post box (aka mail box)

Post office

Post office

We went back up Cemetery Lane.
Cat on a stone wall

Cat on a stone wall


Cemetery Road leaving Holmfirth

Cemetery Road leaving Holmfirth


Up on Cemetery Road, overlooking the town, is the cemetery for the Holy Trinity Parish church. It is on a very steep hill.
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There was a sign on the gate which said
Holy Trinity Parochial Church Council, which has responsibility for this cemetery, is considering plans to redesign the Garden of Remembrance. This is the area where families lay to rest the cremated remains of loved ones. If this concerns you and your family directly, or if you would like to hear about the plans, be consulted or make a comment, you are invited to contact the Reverent Keith Griffin, the vicar
Garden of Remembrance

Garden of Remembrance


Cemetery gate

Cemetery gate


The other sign on the gate says:
HOLY TRINITY CHURCH

  • Polite Notice*

All dogs must be kept on lead at all times. Any fouling must be removed
-------
Please keep to footpaths

  • ------------ *

No unsupervised children
---------------
No glass vases to be left

We took a bunch of photos in that cemetery. I went along the path as far as I could. Bob walked up and down the hill.
Bob taking photos in the cemetery

Bob taking photos in the cemetery

From the gate looking down into the cemetery

From the gate looking down into the cemetery


Then while Bob was finishing up, I took my telephoto lens out and took some photos of the valley below. It is more than just old stone buildings.
Red brick house

Red brick house

Laundry hanging out

Laundry hanging out

Half timbered roof and large chimney pots

Half timbered roof and large chimney pots

House on the hill opposite the cemetery

House on the hill opposite the cemetery

House with solar panels (top of photo)

House with solar panels (top of photo)


Two men stopped and watched Bob for a bit and then came to where I was sitting on the scooter behind the gate, and asked if I knew why the man was taking photos. I said "Yes, he is my husband". So they asked again "Why is he taking photos". I said "Because I asked him to." So then they said, "Is this a kind of hobby", and I said yes that it was. But I didn't go into specifics.
Sheep opposite the Holy Trinity Cemetery

Sheep opposite the Holy Trinity Cemetery


Bob got finished with one section about 2:30 (all the hill climbing up and down made him sore the next day) and we decided to see if we could get a meal at the Winery. But they said they were expecting a bus load of people at 3 and they were fully booked at 5. (They close at 6). So we left and went on back to the B&B. Probably just as well as their website reads like it would be too fancy for us. When we failed to get a place to eat at the Holmfirth Winery and we didn't want to try to find the pub which was supposed to be a short distance away (but which we never saw) I thought of another option. The literature in the room said we could have a packed lunch. I ask if they would do that instead of dinner. And she said that would be fine, she would make it and put it in the dining room for us.

It was a really good lunch - roast beef sandwiches, cherry tomatoes, chips (not french fries but actual potato chips),
Packed lunch - roast beef and cherry tomatoes

Packed lunch - roast beef and cherry tomatoes


water, home made fruit cake and fruit.
Fruit, fruit cake and chips

Fruit, fruit cake and chips


Afterward we were spent some time looking out the window at the sheep and lambs.
View from the breakfast room

View from the breakfast room


Coddy's farm apparently has both cows, pigs and sheep. But while driving around the country, I saw more sheep than anything else, although I did see a few piebald draft horses.

They were letting the sheep outside for the first time since the lambs were born. They let the ewes out first. The farm lady said that each ewe has a metal ear tag which tells what farm she belongs to, when she was born, and who her parents were.
Ewes before the lambs were let out

Ewes before the lambs were let out

Marked sheep before the lambs were turned out

Marked sheep before the lambs were turned out

1298 Lambs and Ewes from the breakfast room

1298 Lambs and Ewes from the breakfast room


When the lambs are born, they color code the sheep and their lambs. Blue paint on the sheep means one lamb. Red (I never saw any red) means twins, and Green means triplets.
Ewes and a lamb

Ewes and a lamb


That way if she sees a sheep with green paint on her, and sees two lambs, she knows she has to look for another lamb. Bob jokingly said that the marking on the ewes back was too high for the lambs to see so she need to teach the lambs to read the ear tags.
Sheep and lamb

Sheep and lamb


She replied that the ewe could see the mark on the lambs back. In actual fact, the ewes don't need the colors on the back to identify their own lamb(s) and they will chase away any lambs that don't belong to them. We also saw a pheasant.
Pheasant

Pheasant

Posted by greatgrandmaR 11:39 Archived in England Comments (2)

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